Samaritan Counseling Center of the Mohawk Valley

Our Mission

A not-for-profit organization, Samaritan Counseling officially opened its doors in April of 1980. Samaritan Counseling adopted its name through affiliation with the Samaritan Institute of Denver. This affiliation has been invaluable, providing the Center with leadership development and regular accreditation visits.

The Samaritan Counseling Center of the Mohawk Valley, Inc. is an interfaith organization committed to a unique concern for the spiritual dimension of human life. Our mission is to offer high quality psychotherapy and pastoral counseling to individuals, couples, & families. Our interdisciplinary staff is trained to assist persons who seek relief from suffering and help them bring new healing and hope to their lives.

Therapists at the Samaritan Counseling Center offer experienced guidance for those difficult first steps on a path toward personal growth.  For years, professionals throughout the community have relied on the experienced therapists at SCC to help their clients, patients, students and parishioners. All members of our multidisciplined staff have postgraduate degrees in their areas of specialty.

The Samaritan Counseling Center continues to grow and develop to accommodate its ever-expanding role as a leading provider of psychotherapy services in the Greater Utica area, with satellite offices in Herkimer and Rome.

Samaritan works deeply with faith communities, partners with other not-for-profit agencies, and encures that quality services are accessible to all people regardless of ability to pay fees. A vital part of Samaritan's mission is to provide outreach in the community.

 

 “When we honestly ask ourselves which person in our lives mean the most to us, we often find that it is those who, instead of giving advice, solutions, or cures, have chosen rather to share our pain and touch our wounds with a warm and tender hand. The friend who can be silent with us in a moment of despair or confusion, who can stay with us in an hour of grief and bereavement, who can tolerate not knowing, not curing, not healing and face with us the reality of our powerlessness, that is a friend who cares.”
Henri J.M. Nouwen, Out of Solitude: Three Meditations on the Christian Life